Gear Institute

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Okay, picture this: You're on the trail run of your dreams, making your best time ever, when it starts raining. Hard. And wouldn't you know it, your feet are soaked and blisters are but a few minutes behind—in the shoes you spent so much money on. Complete bummer! But what if you could find out more before you invested in the gear you count on? What if you could benefit from someone's rock-solid experience, assessment, and insights? What if you just head over to the Gear Institute and we stop asking you questions?
The Gear Institute is a network of the best outdoor gear testers in America, dedicated to providing you the most professional, objective, and helpful advice you can get about what gear you should buy (and how you should use it). We are committed users of outdoor gear—professional guides, product engineers, specialty shop employees, athletes, writers, and everyday outdoor people. And we’re stoked about good gear. Our goal is to professionalize outdoor gear testing. We conduct fair, thorough, head-to-head tests of comparable outdoor products, both under controlled conditions and in appropriate real-world field-testing scenarios. We publish our testing criteria and open our methodology to discussion. Above all, we strive to provide fair, objective, and credible product reviews to the buyers of outdoor gear. That means we cannot and will not be influenced in any way by advertisers, product representatives, or our own biases. We want to provide you the most dependable gear-buying advice on the planet.

Sounds like they're doing it right! Except for the guy in that picture. Hell-ooo? Ever heard of the Earth's gravitational pull? Dude, please don't fall!

Er, at least not until we grab a camera. What is it about impending danger that makes us incapable of looking away? No matter how crazy the antic—walking on a tightrope that's 1,368 feet in the air, say—we humans have to watch. Could explain reality television, no?